Egg in a Bottle

By | February 27, 2013


We did this Egg in a Bottle Experiment a week ago when we had a couple friends over.  The kids all thought it was pretty cool when the egg got sucked into the bottle (as you can see from the pictures below).  I will be honest and let you know that we had a few issues at first getting the egg sucked in.  I thought you could just lite a match and put it in the bottle and then the Air pressure would suck in the egg.  WRONG a match does not produce enough fire for this to happen.  So we finally used some paper and that worked great.  If you like this experiment don’t forget to check out our other Science Experiments here.

What is happening with this experiment?  Before the fire was put into the bottle, the pressure of the air inside the bottle was the same as outside the bottle. The fire then heats the air inside the bottle. This causes the air inside to expand. When you put the egg is on top of the bottle it then seals the bottle, and the fire goes out. When the fire goes out the air inside the bottle cools. As the air cools it contracts, and the pressure of the air inside the bottle becomes less than the pressure outside. Then, the higher outside pressure pushes the egg into the bottle.

Side Note:  Don’t worry if you egg does not go into the bottle whole. We did this about 4 times and each time our eggs were torn while being sucked into the bottle.

Supplies
1 hard boiled egg
1 glass bottle (we used a Snapple one, it has a wider opening)
2 pieces of paper
1 match

Directions

 Get your hard boiled egg, and put a piece of paper in your bottle.
 Light another piece of paper and let it burn for a sec then drop it in your bottle.
As soon as you drop the paper in put your egg on top of the bottle
 Watch as your egg starts to get sucked in to the bottle
Don’t look away you might miss it!
 There it goes!
 And the egg is now in the bottle.
Science is so COOL!

You Might Also Like:

31 thoughts on “Egg in a Bottle

  1. Paula Miller

    Hi! Just found you through Thumping Thursday and am now following through GFC and G+…hope you’ll stop by and say hello :)

    I also just pinned this egg experiment ~ looks so fun and I love the look on your kids faces :)

    Paula
    lifeasweknowitbypaula.blogspot.com

    Reply
    1. We-Made-That.com

      I know the expressions on their faces was priceless. I just love when we do an experiment and they get like that! Thanks for following I will go check out your blog too!

      Reply
  2. Sorting Sprinkles

    Glad you shared it along with the tips. I am planning on trying it sometime this school year so I’m glad I’ll have some guidelines to go by! :)

    Reply
  3. Heather

    Looking forward to checking out your other experiments! Love the, “What is happening” section of your post! Very helpful.

    Reply
    1. We-Made-That.com

      Thanks! I always see cool experiments on blogs but they never tell you what science is happening. Since I come from a family of science teacher I knew I had to put the science in there ;)

      Reply
  4. Hilary

    Great photos! LOL Love the little girl’s mouth agape as the egg falls in. You got the right moment!

    Reply
    1. We-Made-That.com

      That is cool your son loves science so much. My daughters are really enjoying it too, and it is a great way to get them into learning while having fun at the same time! I will go check out your hop on Tuesday thanks for the invite!

      Reply
  5. The Contessa

    Fun stuff! My grandkids will love this. Thanks for sharing at What’d You Do This Weekend. Hope to see you next week.

    Reply
  6. Sugar Aunts

    Love the looks of wonder and excitment on the kids faces! Such a great experiment, thanks for sharing on Share it Saturday!

    Reply
  7. Sally Williams

    You can get it out again by tipping it upside down so that the egg forms a seal around the opening and then running the bottle under a hot tap. The heat increases the pressure inside the bottle and pushes the egg out. A pretty impressive demo and some great science to be learned. X

    Reply
  8. Pingback: Rain in a Jar | We Made That

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *